Posted by Craig Borlase on 10 June 2014




What part can multicultural worship play in connecting with communities the church wants to reach?
Do we see the wealth of scripture that has something to add to the multicultural worship debate?
Do we seen connection or do we see difference?
How much longer can we go on just celebrating our ‘difference’ in worship?
At some point, aren’t we going to have to work out what unites us?
Ephesians 2:11-22 - Do we see the outsiders coming in like this?
Do we see the cross breaking down barriers between us and God as well as between us and our fellow citizens?
Revelation 5:9 - Do we see songs as opportunities to celebrate that which God has done for US, not just ME?
Can we celebrate on behalf of another?
Revelation 7:9 - Look around us and ask whether we see the new congregation forming?
Why (not)?
Do we see our diversity as something that is defined by a wider culture or scripture?
Are we prepared to take a risk to step into someone else’s shoes?
Why do I feel more comfortable reading a testimony book from someone from another culture than I do singing their songs in their language?
How can we help people to find their sound?
What part can music play in bringing together people of diverse backgrounds?
When we are as multi-dimensional as we are today, how do we find a sound that is both authentic and coherent?
Is language limiting our criss-cultural connection?
How often have we given up at the first sign of difficulty?
Considering history, how can we expect it to be anything other than hard work?
How many of our sacred cows will have to be smashed if we are to find a better way of worshipping together?
What does the church do with people of other cultures whose voices are not currently heard?
Can we avoid the mistakes of the past when new communities were brought in to church but not catered for?
What is worship when it doesn’t does in the west?
Can we change the way we do things?
Can I stop and talk between songs?
Can I dance with someone?
Can we ditch the idea that we have to somehow sing the presence of God into the building?
Isn’t He here already?
And what would it look like if we believed all this?
Do we think that changing a phrase or a line in a song - translating it into another language - is beyond us?
Do we think the songs can’t take it?
Do we need to readjust our view of the role that songs play in worship?
Unless we are able to see each other as equals, how can we ever hope to break out of the model where some feel inferior and others feel superior?
Are we willing to move on from being exporters of product and work harder to support and release worshippers from other cultures?
Are we prepared to feel like the outsiders?
Are we prepared to let go?
Are we prepared to risk this position of comfort and privilege?
What part can multicultural worship play in connecting with communities the church wants to reach?

Do we see the wealth of scripture that has something to add to the multicultural worship debate?

Do we seen connection or do we see difference?

How much longer can we go on just celebrating our ‘difference’ in worship?

At some point, aren’t we going to have to work out what unites us?

Ephesians 2:11-22 - Do we see the outsiders coming in like this?

Do we see the cross breaking down barriers between us and God as well as between us and our fellow citizens?

Revelation 5:9 - Do we see songs as opportunities to celebrate that which God has done for US, not just ME?

Can we celebrate on behalf of another?

Revelation 7:9 - Look around us and ask whether we see the new congregation forming?

Why (not)?

Do we see our diversity as something that is defined by a wider culture or scripture?

Are we prepared to take a risk to step into someone else’s shoes?

Why do I feel more comfortable reading a testimony book from someone from another culture than I do singing their songs in their language?

How can we help people to find their sound?

What part can music play in bringing together people of diverse backgrounds?

When we are as multi-dimensional as we are today, how do we find a sound that is both authentic and coherent?

Is language limiting our criss-cultural connection?

How often have we given up at the first sign of difficulty?

Considering history, how can we expect it to be anything other than hard work?

How many of our sacred cows will have to be smashed if we are to find a better way of worshipping together?

What does the church do with people of other cultures whose voices are not currently heard?

Can we avoid the mistakes of the past when new communities were brought in to church but not catered for?

What is worship when it doesn’t does in the west?

Can we change the way we do things?

Can I stop and talk between songs?

Can I dance with someone?

Can we ditch the idea that we have to somehow sing the presence of God into the building?

Isn’t He here already?

And what would it look like if we believed all this?

Do we think that changing a phrase or a line in a song - translating it into another language - is beyond us?

Do we think the songs can’t take it?

Do we need to readjust our view of the role that songs play in worship?

Unless we are able to see each other as equals, how can we ever hope to break out of the model where some feel inferior and others feel superior?

Are we willing to move on from being exporters of product and work harder to support and release worshippers from other cultures?

Are we prepared to feel like the outsiders?

Are we prepared to let go?

Are we prepared to risk this position of comfort and privilege?

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